Donald W. Clayton Graduate Program in Engineering Science

Program Overview

The Donald W. Clayton Graduate Program in Engineering Science allows students to pursue graduate study and research in interdisciplinary areas that cross two or more disciplines in different departments or in program areas not currently associated with an existing department.

The interdisciplinary program spans the fields of engineering, science, business, and even law. In principle, a program of study in almost any imaginable concentration area in engineering can be designed. In practice, many students have developed programs in one of three concentration areas: materials science and engineeringenvironmental & technological hazards engineering, and information technology & engineering. Another area of specialization, bioengineering, is currently attracting student interest and encompasses the interface between engineering and biological science.

The concentration area in materials science & engineering involves course work in mechanical, electrical, chemical and civil engineering, computer science, chemistry, and physics. The environmental & technological hazards engineering concentration area has components primarily from chemical and civil engineering, and environmental science, and secondarily from industrial, biological, and petroleum engineering, chemistry, business and sometimes law. The information technology & engineering  concentration area encompasses the disciplines of industrial, electrical and mechanical engineering, and computer science, information systems and decision science, library information systems, and others. Likewise, bioengineering concentration area involves agricultural, civil, mechanical, chemical, and industrial engineering, chemistry, and the biological sciences.

The Ph.D. in Engineering Science with a concentration in biological engineering is the terminal degree in this field which includes bioprocess, biotechnical, biomedical, agricultural, bioenvironmental engineering and related areas. The concentration in construction management includes research in several major areas: advanced material and sustainability, building science for disaster-resistant communities, build environment informatics, capital facility management, and interdisciplinary research in construction. 

Degrees awarded through this program do not provide a direct route to professional engineering registration and practice. Students with degrees in a pure or applied science, who are considering registration as professional engineers, are advised to consider pursuing a second baccalaureate degree in engineering.

Program Administration

Craig Harvey
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
College of Engineering
Telephone: 225-578-8761
Email: coeasscdean@lsu.edu

Vicki Hannan
Coordinator, Donald W. Clayton Program in Engineering Science
Telephone: 225.578.5704
Fax: 225.578.4845
Email: eghann@eng.lsu.edu

Degree Programs

The interdisciplinary degrees of M.S. in Engineering Science and Ph.D. in Engineering Science are offered. The M.S. program requires emphasis in at least two areas of study not available within a single department; the Ph.D. requires at least two sub-areas of specialization within one or more academic departments, in addition to the major concentration area of study.

Master of Science in Engineering Science Program

The M.S. in Engineering Science program - offered with both thesis and non-thesis options - provides an opportunity for study in areas not represented by departments within the college. Students can enter the program with a baccalaureate degree in any field of engineering or in a pure or applied science. The individualized program of study for each student (due at the end of the first semester) will be developed in consultation with and approved by the student's graduate advisory committee. Graduate School regulations require the major professor (committee chair) to be a graduate faculty member from a department within the College of Engineering. The committee must also include at least two additional members of the graduate faculty.

The minimum requirements for the thesis option are 24 semester credit hours coursework, six additional hours of thesis research credit, and successful defense of a research thesis.  The non-thesis option requires a minimum of 36 semester hours of course work including a three-credit hour project course. The project course incorporates a written report and oral presentation to the graduate advisory committee. Additional course work may be necessary for students lacking the proper course prerequisites or as required by the graduate advisory committee and specified on an approved plan of study.

At least one-half of the course work must be engineering courses and at least one-half of the total course work must be at the 7000 level. The program requires emphasis in at least two sub-areas of study not available within a single department and at least 18 hours of required course work and one academic year in residence must be completed after admission to the program.

A plan of study, approved by the student's advisory committee, must be submitted to the Associate Dean for Academic Programs in the College of Engineering by the end of the first semester of enrollment at LSU.

Students applying to transfer into Engineering Science or to enroll as dual degree after one semester at LSU, MUST complete the Engineering Science plan of study as part of the application process.

Doctoral (Ph.D.) Program

The college accepts qualified students with bachelor's or master's degrees in engineering or a pure or applied science to work toward a Ph.D. in this interdisciplinary program. The individualized program of study for each student will be developed in consultation with and approved by the student's graduate advisory committee.  The committee must consist of at least three members of the graduate faculty.  The major professor (advisory committee chair) must be from a department within the College of Engineering and at least one member of the student's committee must come from a department offering the Ph.D. degree in the College of Engineering. The advisory committee must also include representatives from the sub-areas of specialization.

A Ph.D. program of study, approved by the student's advisory committee, should be submitted to the Associate Dean for Academic Programs in the College of Engineering by the start of the second semester of enrollment.  The Dean of the Graduate School makes the final approval of the program of study.

The student will be required to complete a minimum of 54 semester hours of approved course work beyond the bachelor's degree and prepare a dissertation acceptable to his or her advisory committee and the Graduate School. At least half of the course work (27 semester hours) must be taken in courses offered by engineering departments within the college. Requirements include 24 hours of course work concentrated in at least two sub-areas of specialization within one or more academic departments. The remaining 30 semester hours of course work must contain no more than 15 hours in any one department.

Admission and Financial Assistance

Admission is open to students without baccalaureate engineering degrees. Students wishing to work toward a degree through the Donald W. Clayton Graduate Program in Engineering Science should contact an appropriate faculty advisor in the college before applying for admission. "Engineering Science" should be indicated as the proposed field of study.

Research assistantships to qualified students in the Ph.D. program are available on a competitive basis directly through the Donald W. Clayton Program in Engineering Science. MS program students seeking financial assistance should pursue support through their faculty advisors.

Graduate Faculty

The Donald W. Clayton Graduate Program in Engineering Science is interdisciplinary. It encompasses the graduate faculty across all departments within the College of Engineering.

Forms For Graduate Study in Engineering Science